Become a Member

Now Playing

Current DJ: CHIRP DJ

The New Pornographers Crash Years from Together (Matador) Add to Collection

Listen Live

Requests? 773-DJ-SONGS or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The CHIRP Blog

Entries categorized as “Take Two” 24 results

Eddie writesTake Two: “I Wanna Be Adored” (The Stone Roses vs. The Raveonettes)

There is a chance that you have come across a song (or two, or so many more) that you enjoy and did not realize that it's either been covered by someone else or is a cover itself. We hope that this series allows you to appreciate both the original and the covers they have inspired, and to seek out and enjoy new music in the process.

We take a look at The Stone Roses’ signature song and how another band from across the sea from them made it their own decades later while sorta plugging some English footwear.

The Original: The Stone Roses
From the album: The Stone Roses (Silvertone, 1989)

“I Wanna Be Adored” is the opening track from The Stone Roses’ 1989 self-titled debut album, and it is the perfect introduction for this English rock band. One of the most memorable bass lines in rock ‘n’ roll history, the buildup to the first verse is nothing short of pure joy. The lyrics are simple and to the point, with “I don't have to sell my soul/He's already in me” comprising half the lyrics. 

The Stone Roses is a prime example of when a band’s spotlight shines a bit too bright very quickly and fades away almost as fast, either by circumstance or the band’s own undoing. By the end of 1989, they were on top of the charts, performing sold out shows at large theaters, and allowed numerous other neo-psychedelic rock bands to exist like the Charlatans UK and Happy Mondays.

By the end of 1990, they were fighting with their record label, Silvertone (which ended up in court, with the band winning) and taking their sweet time on their second (and final) studio album to follow-up their impressive debut.

The band split up in 1996 and though they have since reunited and toured (and split up again), sometimes it’s for the best when a band and its lead singer have reached their prime and remain in the past, like 8-tracks and MTV’s 120 Minutes.

Keep Reading…

Share May 5, 2022 https://chrp.at/2KWz Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Take Two

Eddie writesTake Two: “Cold, Cold Heart” (Hank Williams vs. Tony Bennett vs. Nat King Cole)

by Eddie Sayago

There is a chance that you have come across a song (or two, or so many more) that you enjoy and did not realize that it's either been covered by someone else or is a cover itself. We hope that this series allows you to appreciate both the original and the covers they have inspired, and to seek out and enjoy new music in the process.

Here we take a look at one of Hank Williams’ most memorable songs and two different covers by two of the most influential male crooners America has ever produced.

Hank Williams (single released 1950 on MGM Records)

Despite his short life (he died on New Year’s Day 1953 at age 29), Hank Williams accomplished more as a musician than most other artists who live twice as long.

Arguably America’s first country music superstar, Williams had written/co-written and recorded over 160 songs over the course of a decade, with 35 of them becoming Top 10 hits on the Country Charts (and 11 of them going to #1). 

“Cold, Cold Heart” was actually a B-Side to a more upbeat single, “Dear John” (a very downer title, if one is familiar with “Dear John” letters/stories). “Cold, Cold Heart” is by far the more memorable of the two songs released on that record in February 1951, quickly becoming a #1 hit and becoming a popular song to cover by other artists.

Though the song could apply to any couple going through hardship, a line in the first verse, “A memory from your lonesome past keeps us so far apart”, references an abortion that Williams’ first wife, Audrey, had that may have been from an extramartial affair.

Hank also had affairs of his own, eventually divorcing Audrey to marry Billie Jean Horton–who later had an affair with Johnny Cash–shortly before his death in October 1952. Horton got her name from her next marriage, to singer Johnny Horton, whom she married the following September.

Keep Reading…

Share March 16, 2022 https://chrp.at/2LTG Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Take Two

Topics: take two

Eddie writesTake Two: “Red Red Wine” (Neil Diamond Vs. UB40)

by Eddie Sayago

There is a chance that you have come across a song (or two, or so many more) that you enjoy and did not realize that it's either been covered by someone else or is a cover itself. We hope that this series allows you to appreciate both the original and the covers they have inspired, and to seek out and enjoy new music in the process.

In this entry, we pay homage to a very popular drinking song that has been on a very crazy journey, from the pen and paper of its songwriter to the top of the pop charts on two continents at two different times during the 1980s.

The Original: Neil Diamond

The cover we will discuss is a dance party compared to Neil Diamond’s depressing look at lost love.

The song, which was a minor but unmemorable single from the Just For You album, is full of heartbreak, as Neil sings about a woman who left him and he is all alone with his bottle of red wine. It almost sounds like he’s holding back tears in the first verse. 

There is also a cover of “I’m A Believer” on Just For You, which he wrote and was recorded by The Monkees, scoring Diamond his first big payday and #1 hit as a songwriter.

At this point of his career, he was best known for writing hit songs for other artists, and Just For You would be a turning point. He performs the song on occasion, which is a crowd favorite, along with “Cherry, Cherry” and “Sweet Caroline.”

Keep Reading…

Share November 22, 2021 https://chrp.at/2Moq Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Take Two

Topics: neil diamond, take two, ub40

Eddie writesTake Two: “These Eyes” (The Guess Who Vs. Jr. Walker & The All Stars)

by Eddie Sayago

There is a chance that you have come across a song (or two, or so many more) that you enjoy and did not realize that it's either been covered by someone else or is a cover itself. We hope that this series allows you to appreciate both the original and the covers they have inspired, and to seek out and enjoy new music in the process.

For this entry, we take a look at a love song that was performed by two very different performers and released in the same year.

The Original: The Guess Who
From the album Wheatfield Soul (RCA, 1969)

Three albums into their career, Canadian rock band The Guess Band took a couple different steps in their journey. First, they got a new lead singer, Burton Cummings, replacing original lead Chad Allen. Next, they leaned into psychedelic and British rock influences for Wheatfield Soul (album #4).

The album wasn’t a big commercial success but “These Eyes” became a hit in their native Canada and their first Top 10 hit in the U.S. (peaked at #6 on Billboard Hot 100), so 1969 wasn’t too bad. And guess what? Their biggest success arrived the following year with their first #1 hit song and album of the same name, "American Woman."

Keep Reading…

Share November 4, 2021 https://chrp.at/2KMn Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Take Two

Clarence Ewing: The Million Year Trip writesTake Two: “I Want Candy” (The Strangeloves Vs. Bow Wow Wow)

by Clarence Ewing

There is a chance that you have come across a song (or two, or so many more) that you enjoy and did not realize that it's either been covered by someone else or is a cover itself. We hope that this series allows you to appreciate both the original and the covers they have inspired, and to seek out and enjoy new music in the process.

The Original: The Strangeloves
from the album I Want Candy (Bang, 1965)

 

The Strangeloves were a New York based production team that had a handful of singles chart in the bottom half of the Hot 100 during the mid-to-late '60s, sometimes using different band names. "I Want Candy" was their 2nd single of note. The percussion sets the tone with an overwhelimg Bo Didley rhythm, immediately putting the listener in the middle of the best beach party ever. It also featues one of the most gloriously ragged guilar riffs in pop music history. At a time when Elvis Presley and Annette Funicello were making the "Beach Party" scene popular across the USA, This was a song that got the go-go dancers movin'.

 

 

Keep Reading…

Share October 29, 2021 https://chrp.at/2K7P Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Take Two

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. »»