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DJ Mick writesCritical Rotation: “Will This Make Me Good” by Nick Hakim

Twice a month, CHIRP DJ and Features Co-Director Mick takes a deep dive into two albums currently in rotation on CHIRP's charts that he thinks are worth some special attention. If you haven't given these albums a listen in their entirety, let Mick make the case for why you should!

Nick Hakim
Will This Make Me Good
ATO

The DC-based R’nB singer Nick Hakim’s existential and moral curiosities over runneth the pitcher of his mind on his second studio LP, Will This Make Me Good.

Working within the sturdy, if ponderous, architecture of his debut Green Twins, Hakim uses this blueprint of trancy, psychedelic soul and fog-machined, garage R’nB to find new hopeful directions for himself and others in a world that offers no easy resolutions.

Emblematic of his searching ray of sunshine through the clouds of our tempestuous present, is the wet and weary opener “All These Changes,” which tells the story of human civilization being slowly swept off the map by raging wildfires and rising coastlines, to a calming, orchestral, folk-funk flow that lands somewhere between Jethro Tull and Curtis Mayfield.

This is of course a tragic story to begin your album with, but it is ultimately a story of renewal. Unlike the much bleaker, but surprisingly tender, static-submerged, trip-and-scratch, daydream soul of “Vincent Tyler,” which recounts the killing of a titular young man in Hakim’s native DC, who was shot and killed in an alley in 2007, and who may have been saved, had the neighbors checked on the gunshots that they had heard the night before.

As dark as this story is, Hakim doesn’t pass judgment on its subjects. Human curiosity can easily be overcome by a sense of self-preservation, and when one hears gunshots in the distance, it usually not most people’s first instinct to run towards them.

A similarly empathetic and accepting depiction of human nature can be found on the angelic, spiritual jazz and sophic soul that flows upward out of an Alice in Wonderland-like, backwards tumble through a rabbit hole of existential quandaries, all of which surface in the passing of a loved one. On this track Hakim speaks to a friend who has died, asking, “Qadir what’s the deal now?” It’s a question without an answer and appears to be asked without a demand for a response.

Hakim isn’t really requesting replies to quell his curiosities for unknowable things. Rather he realizes that the search for such rejoinders is the source of what little solace that can be had in this world. 

Mick is always writing about something he's heard. Possibly even something you'd like. You can read his stuff over at I Thought I Heard a Sound Blog.

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Categorized: Album Reviews

Topics: nick hakim

DJ Mick writesCritical Rotation: “Regresa” by Buscabulla

Twice a month, CHIRP DJ and Features Co-Director Mick takes a deep dive into two albums currently in rotation on CHIRP's charts that he thinks are worth some special attention. If you haven't given these albums a listen in their entirety, let Mick make the case for why you should!

Buscabulla
Regresa
Ribbon Music

Recorded in its entirety at their home in their native Puerto Rico, husband and wife musical duo, Raquel Berrios and Luis Alfredo Del Valle, examine the increasing pressures and dissatisfactions of their home island through richly textured and dreamy disco and gold-tinted, cumbia cupping, motorik soul, on their debut LP as Buscabulla, titled Regresa.

In the wake of Hurricane Maria the harsh realities of c0ontinued colonial rule in the 21st century became writ large for the world to see, with residents forced to survive with limited or no access to electricity and potable water for weeks.

At the same time, supplies spoiled on docks while emergency response workers partied in resort hotels, and the so-called President picked beef with local politicians whose only goals were to provide for their people.

The album title Regresa means “return,” and it is a meditation on the needs of a people and a culture who are prisoners of tyrannical circumstances- trapped in a capitalist nightmare where the only solutions tenable to those in power are those that will enrich them further, and where any benefits that actually reach the needy are incidental at best.

Through all this anxiety, doubt, and anger, comes a beautifully introspective album that refuses to submit to the survival position offered to the people of Puerto Rico.

Soundscapes of triumphant joy echo out from the syncopated funk of “NTE,” the infectiously bright and smooth R’nB of “Ta Que Tiembla,” the unwavering, hiccupy glisten of "Club Tú y Yo," and the deep bassy charm and star-fire sparkle of the lovingly warm tribute to Nydia Caro, simply titled “Nydia.”

Every song on Regresa will find it’s way into your heart, if only you are open to the experience.

Mick is always writing about something he's heard. Possibly even something you'd like. You can read his stuff over at I Thought I Heard a Sound Blog.

Share June 25, 2020 http://chrp.at/1KRF Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Album Reviews

Topics: buscabulla

Clarence Ewing: The Million Year Trip writesSnipes from the Chicago Film Society

CHIRP Radio's Citations presents interesting and informative content about Chicago or music (or both) from around the Web.

A perfect addition to your at-home movie watching experience, this assemblage of "snipes," was put together by the great folks at the Chicago Film Society. Watching it straight through is the best kind of trippy, Night Flight-esque stroll down our collective memory lanes.

In the words of CFS:

Assembling the reels of snipes and trailers we show before the feature presentations is one of our favorite parts of showing a movie.

These little bits of cinema ephemera — some as short as two seconds long — are among the most treasured items in the CFS film collection. (When you think about the thousands of people who watched them over the years, an advertisement for "Steamed or Grilled Hot Dogs" can become a two hanky movie).

Since we can't show them to you in public, we've posted a reel of digitized snipes, daters, and theatre ads on our Vimeo page for you to enjoy.

"Thread them up" before your next streaming or laserdisc binge at home.

All were generously scanned by our friend (and snipe expert) Walter Forsberg.

 

CFS Snipe Reel from Chicago Film Society on Vimeo.

Share June 12, 2020 http://chrp.at/1LG9 Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Citations

Topics: movies

Clarence Ewing: The Million Year Trip writesWhat NOT To Do When Visiting Chicago

CHIRP Radio's Citations presents interesting and informative content about Chicago or music (or both) from around the Web.

At some point in the future, there WILL come a time when we can step outside our doors and not have to worry as much about social distancing and how to prevent a deadly disease from spreadng. Until then, we can always take time ro reflect on our fair city and what makes it special.

This video from the series Wolters World puts a twist on the regular traveler's tour, providing advice on what NOT to do when visiting Chicago. It's always nice to get a different perspective on what makes Chicago fun and interesting.

Share June 11, 2020 http://chrp.at/1LDT Share on Facebook Tweet This!

Categorized: Citations

Topics: citations

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